Food Philosophy

HHC Food Philosophy:
by Detria Branch, Contributing Editor
HHC Certified Instructor, Nutritional Health Coach

In a perfect world, we strive to uphold standards that we hope will pass on to our children and the families which they are apart.

As we navigate this winding highway on the road to good health, it is integral that we are aware of not only providing ingredients with which to create tasty and healthy meals and snacks, but quality foods, from clean, pure and wholesome sources.

Below are the preferred guidelines from which we look upon, whenever possible, to ensure that we are doing our part to support the health of our children, our economy and our planet.

Eat Clean. Keep your food sources as close to Mother Nature as possible.
Take the Science Out of Your Food. If you can't pronounce it, you probably shouldn't be eating it.
Shop Local. Not only does this support our local economy, most importantly with small businesses, but the shorter the distance produce needs to travel, the more nutritious it can be!
Shop Seasonally. Seasonal produce is more affordable, which will help keep anyone in budget and will also reduce environmental costs of long distance transportation.
Shop Wisely. Fresh and healthy food should be affordable! Use coupons, weekly sales, in-­store specials, farmers markets and buying clubs to get the most for your money.
Avoid Trans Fats. This includes partially and fully hydrogenated oils. Avoid labels that claim 0g trans fats, since there are still trans fats in the product (ingredient list should confirm).
Avoid Excess Sugars. Look for foods that are minimally sweetened, sweetened with natural sugars (e.g. fruit juice, honey, molasses) or use a safe natural alternative (i.e. stevia, xylitol).
Reduce Refined Carbohydrates. Avoid bleached, white flours and sugars. Look for multi-grain, 100% whole grain and 100% fruit/vegetable juice on the label.
Shop Organic. Organic foods (i.e. dairy, meats, grains, legumes and produce) support a cleaner environment and a healthier and more nutritionally sound mind and body. They are GMO-­‐free, as well as being free of antibiotics, growth hormones, pesticides, herbicides, sewage sludge and irradiation. Look for organic ingredients listed, “made with organic ingredients” stated or the USDA Organic certification seal. When shopping for produce, look for a 9 on the PLU sticker or trust your local farmer.
Avoid GMOs. Genetically Modified or Genetically Enhanced ingredients. GMOs are designated with an 8 on the PLU sticker for produce. Labeling is an option, not a mandate, and is rarely done. Support your state’s initiative to mandate GMO labeling of our foods. We can also vote with our pocketbooks by buying GMO-­free and/or organic foods! Visit www.NonGMOProject.org and see if your favorite products are verified!
Avoid Artificial Sweeteners. Includes: acesulfame-­‐K (acesulfame potassium), aspartame, sucralose (Splenda) and saccharin.
Avoid Artificial Preservatives. Includes: ammonium chloride, azodicarbonamide, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole), BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene), potassium benzoate, potassium bisulfite, potassium bromate, potassium metabisulfite, etc.
Avoid Artificial Colorings and Flavorings. Includes: carmine, vanillin, ethyl vanillin, titanium dioxide, D&C blue # 1 & 2, red dye #40, yellow #6 ,etc.

If Fish or Animal Protein is Part of Your Current Diet:

Shop Wild Caught Fish. Farmed raised fish aren’t fed the optimal diet and contribute to the pollution of our waters. To get a healthier omega-­3 ratio in the diet, look for wild caught whenever possible.

Shop Grass-­fed and/or Organic Meats. These meats are not only free of antibiotics, hormones and growth promoters, but the animals are also fed grass and/or organic feed and raised in a healthier environment.

HHC Teaching Methodology:

HHC does not subscribe to any one method of teaching nutrition (i.e. raw foods vs. vegan cooking, or even MyPlate). Our goal as instructors is to try to meet our students exactly where they are on their own health journey - and that will be different for everyone.

For some, that means reducing fast-foods in their diet. For others, it means reducing processed foods or foods that may cause sensitivities, like dairy. For others it may mean moving toward a more plant-based diet.

HHC Instructors teach their own food and cooking methodologies in their classes using HHC lesson plans and recipes which can be found in our extensive back office recipe library and found using keywords such as "dairy free" or "vegan" or "breakfast" etc.

Principle #1

Eat Clean

Keep your food sources as close to Mother Nature as possible. Take the Science Out of Your Food. If you can't pronounce it, you probably shouldn't be eating it.

Principle #2

Shop Local

Keep your food sources as close to Mother Nature as possible. Take the Science Out of Your Food. If you can't pronounce it, you probably shouldn't be eating it.

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